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Add To Calendar 21/02/2017 09:00:0021/02/2017 09:20:00America/ChicagoAquaculture America 2017INTERACTION BETWEEN DIETARY SOY AND ANIMAL PROTEIN ONTO THE TAURINE REQUIREMENT IN WHITE SEABASS Atractoscion nobilis AND CALIFORNIA YELLOWTAIL Seriola lalandi. Salon DThe World Aquaculture Societyjohnc@was.orgfalseanrl65yqlzh3g1q0dme13067DD/MM/YYYY

INTERACTION BETWEEN DIETARY SOY AND ANIMAL PROTEIN ONTO THE TAURINE REQUIREMENT IN WHITE SEABASS Atractoscion nobilis AND CALIFORNIA YELLOWTAIL Seriola lalandi.

Guillaume Salze*, Dave Jirsa, Mark Drawbridge, and D. Allen Davis
School of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences
Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
gzs0010@auburn.edu

 

Taurine has garnered a lot of attention in recent years, as evidence showed that it was an essential nutrient in a number of teleost species. However, quantitative estimates of requirement show a wide variation across species, and interactions with source of dietary proteins lowering taurine bioavailability have been hypothesized to explain this discrepancy. Preliminary data in our lab suggested as much: taurine requirement for WSB juveniles was 0.99% of the diet when using a high soy diet, while equivalent growth rates were observed on a fishmeal diet (56.7% fishmeal as unique source of protein, 0.39% taurine). Although additional taurine supplementation to the fishmeal diet was not evaluated, this suggests that bioavailability of taurine may be reduced in soy-based diet, thereby resulting in the need for higher dietary inclusion rate in order to meet the animal's taurine requirement.

To clarify this situation, two series of diets, based on an animal protein (poultry by-product meal) or a vegetable protein (soybean meal) were manufactured based on previous successful formulations, and supplemented with matching, graded levels of taurine. Diets will be formulated to be isoproteic and isolipidic to contain 44% protein and 12% lipid for CYT and 40% protein and 10% lipid for WSB. We hypothesized that the source of protein would have no effect on the growth response, thus on the quantitative estimation of the taurine requirement. The design follows a slope-ratio assay approach. Results were evaluated in terms of growth rate, feed efficiency, survival, as well as nutrient retention and retention efficiency.

Results show that taurine availability was affected by the dietary protein source in white seabass, but not in yellowtail, thereby highlighting a species-specific effect and sensitivity to vegetable protein sources. The underlying explanation for such species difference remains poorly understood.







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