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Add To Calendar 24/02/2016 13:30:0024/02/2016 13:50:00America/ChicagoAquaculture 2016KNOW THY ENEMY: HOW ANALYSIS OF THE NORTHEASTERN PATHOGENIC POPULATION OF Vibrio parahaemolyticus CAN IMPROVE PATHOGEN IDENTIFICATION AND RISK ASSESMENT   BurgundyThe World Aquaculture Societyjohnc@was.orgfalseanrl65yqlzh3g1q0dme13067DD/MM/YYYY

KNOW THY ENEMY: HOW ANALYSIS OF THE NORTHEASTERN PATHOGENIC POPULATION OF Vibrio parahaemolyticus CAN IMPROVE PATHOGEN IDENTIFICATION AND RISK ASSESMENT  

Cheryl A. Whistler*, Feng Xu, Ashley L. Marcinkiewicz, Jeffrey Hall, Kevin Drees, Malachi Hallee, Vaughn Cooper, and Stephen Jones
University of New Hampshire, Northeast Center for Vibrio Disease and Ecology and Department of Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences.
Cheryl.Whistler@unh.edu

Even though infections by Vibrio parahaemolyticus have been historically rare in the Northeast, recent years have seen a steep rise in reported cases, most often linked to the consumption of raw shellfish. The comparison of clinical and environmental strains from this region with those from a global distribution indicates that the majority of infections traced to local sources are caused by only a few distinctive strains. The ecologically invasive ST36 O4:K12 strain that originated in the north Pacific continues to account for most infections from multiple harvest areas in the Atlantic. Whole genome analysis has revealed genetic traits that are characteristics of distinct populations in the Atlantic that should inform more accurate trace-back. Infections are also caused by several strain types that appear resident, but are not isolated to the Northeast. These studies indicate even with the mobility of strains that increases disease risk, that local populations are yet defined. These analyses allowed the identification of strain specific genetic loci that we used to develop strain-specific quantitative PCR detection assays for the rapid quantification of strains of most concern within total and Vibrio populations in environmental samples including oysters. This study demonstrates how the collaborative efforts of local public health agencies, shellfish managers, growers, and researchers can provide tools to enhance specific surveillance of strains of most threat promoting a safer product.

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